OFFICIAL BIO

The artist

The Artist in a reflective moment

BORN IN 1629 TO POOR, BUT DISHONEST, PARENTS IN DELFT, HOLLAND Daniel Milberg began his artistic studies at an early age under the tutelage of the great Dutch master Jan Vermeer (1632-75). His paintings, however, were problematic (not to mention his drawings and etchings). Vermeer was encouraging, but, after watching Milberg struggle for several years, tactfully suggested that he might want to try something more suited to his talents, such as necromancy (sorcery). Milberg, always sensitive to criticism, was deeply hurt. The two apparently never spoke again.

Little is known for certain about his life after that point. He seems to have fled the Netherlands after an aesthetic/financial dispute with painter Frans Hals (the Elder) (c.1580–1666) eventually settling in New England where he earned some recognition as a painter of the region’s many textile mills (most of which did not need painting).

Milberg had to wait almost 350 years for the perfection of the device that would allow him to express himself artistically: the personal computer. Introduced to digital graphics while an intern at PBS television, he never looked back. He continued honing his graphic design skills at a giant cable television company. In 2004 he decided to drop all outside distractions and develop his art.

Milberg draws his inspiration from many sources, among them; William Harnett and the other meticulous trompe l’oeil painters of the 19th century; Francisco Goya’s disturbing etchings The Disasters of War, and J.S.G. Boggs, the great contemporary currency artist.

In a remarkable parallel to Vermeer, he has enjoyed only slight recognition during his short life, and his work has often been forgotten or confused with that of others.


Sources:

Eine Existenzphilosophische Analyse des Dadaismus (An Existential Philosophical Analysis of DADA-ism), Heinrich Heimlich-Maneuver (Prague 1901) Cesoslovenská Grafická Unia

Mutations du Surréalisme de L’exil Américain (Mutations of Surrealism in the American Exile), Guillaume Appollinaire (Paris 1949) Éditions Gallimard

Harnett

Harnett

Boggs

Boggs

Goya

Goya